We welcome enrollments in our summer courses from all college students.  Our summer sessions courses attract a diverse student body, with students from UCLA, from two and four year universities in the United States, and from international schools.  We welcome enrollments in Economics 1 and 2 from students attending high school in the United States.

To best accommodate all of our students during the COVID-19 pandemic, Summer 2021 course offerings will have the following features: 

  1. All classes will be pre-recorded or have live lectures that are recorded on Zoom so that all students (domestic and those international students living abroad) can follow any course at their own leisure. 
  2. Each course will offer multiple live zoom Q&A (Discussion) sessions to accommodate varying time zones to the best of the instructor’s ability.
  3. Each instructor will offer varying zoom office hours to accommodate varying time zones to the best of their abilities. 
  4. All final assessments will accommodate varying time zones to the best of the instructor’s abilities.

If you are a regular UCLA student who is considered an out-of-state student, please note that Non-Resident Tuition (NRT) is not charged during the summer. Therefore, you will pay the same fees that an in-state student pays.

For questions on Summer Session Fees please go to  https://summer.ucla.edu/fees. For questions about financial aid, please contact https://www.financialaid.ucla.edu/Contact-Us.

If you have any questions about UCLA’s Economics summer courses, please contact our Academic Program Coordinator, Ed McDevitt, at mcdevitt@econ.ucla.edu

In the Subject Heading of the message – please put: “Summer Sessions”

Below are the list of Economics courses that we will be offering each session. Please click on the respective course syllabus to find information on exam dates.

Summer Session A — June 21st-July 30th

Econ 1 Principles of Economics
Econ 2 Principles of Economics
Econ 5* Introductory Economics
Econ 11 Microeconomic Theory
Econ 41 Statistics for Economists
Econ 101 Microeconomic Theory
Econ 102 Macroeconomics Theory
Econ 104/104L Data Science for Economists
Econ 106F Finance
Econ 106G Introduction to Game Theory
Econ 111 Theories of Development
Econ 134 Environmental Economics
Econ 160 Money & Banking

*satisfies GE requirement

Summer Session C — August 2nd-September 10th

Econ 1 Principles of Economics
Econ 2 Principles of Economics
Econ 10P Economics Toolkit: Introduction to Python for Economists
Econ 10R Economics Toolkit: An Introduction to R for Economists
Econ 11 Microeconomic Theory
Econ 41 Statistics for Economists
Econ 97 Economic Toolkit
Econ 101 Microeconomic Theory
Econ 102 Macroeconomics Theory
Econ 103/103L Introduction to Econometrics
Econ 106F Finance
Econ 122 International Finance
Econ 165 History of Capitalism in American Economy

Lower Division Courses

1. Principles of Economics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open to students with credit for former course 100. Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on allocation of resources and distribution of income through price system. P/NP or letter grading.

2. Principles of Economics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 1. Not open to students with credit for former course 100. Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on aggregative economics, including national income, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade. P/NP or letter grading.

4. Introduction to Investments. (4) Lecture, two hours. Broad introduction to investments. No previous financial, economic, or math background needed. Students learn organizing framework with which to understand investing landscape with highlight on key concepts and functionality related to business and personal investments. Topics include why financial markets exist and how they work, efficient market hypothesis, risk versus reward, investment styles, valuation techniques, simple quantitative analysis, power of compound interest, financial crises, and role private equity, venture capital, innovation and start-ups, personal financial advisers, exchange rates, central banks, financial statements, value creation, interpreting financial ratios, understanding present value, diversification, Capital Asset Pricing Model, Sharpe ratio, and understanding asset’s beta, hedge funds. Serves as excellent introduction to career paths in finance and for those who want to increase their financial literacy. May not be used to fulfill entrance requirements for any Economics Department major. P/NP grading.

5. Introductory Economics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Not open to students with credit for course 1, 2, or former course 100. Principles of economics as tools of analysis. Presentation of set of concepts with which to analyze wide range of social problems that economic theory illuminates. May not be used to fulfill entrance requirements for any Economics Department major. Satisfies GE and Diversity requirements. P/NP or letter grading.

10P. Economics Toolkit: Introduction to Python for Economists. (4) Lecture, three hours. Python is commonly used programming language for data science. It is powerful and easy to learn tool that can be applied to make simple histograms or fit complicated machine learning models. Introduction to using Python for basic data exploration, analysis, and visualization. Emphasis on applications with economic data and econometric analysis. P/NP grading.

10R. Economics Toolkit: An Introduction to R for Economists. (4) Lecture, three hours. Hands-on introduction to data analysis in economics using R. Covers essential mathematical tools and introduces mechanics of R. No prior knowledge of R, computer programming, statistics, or economics is required. P/NP grading.

11. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 1, 2, Mathematics 31A, 31B. Laws of demand, supply, returns, and costs; price and output determination in different market situations. P/NP or letter grading.

41. Statistics for Economists. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B. Not open to students with credit for former Statistics 11. Introduction to probability and statistics for economists, with emphasis on rigorous arguments. Letter grading.

97. Economic Toolkit. (4) Lecture, three hours. Coverage of essential mathematical and programming skills needed for study of Economics. Review of calculus (first derivatives, partial derivatives, elementary integral calculus), Excel (handling data, using simple arithmetical, mathematical, and financial functions, use of Solver), and extended introduction to statistical language R and/or Stata. Consult instructor for specific software. Offered in summer only. P/NP grading.

101. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 11. Theory of factor pricing and income distribution, general equilibrium, implications of pricing process for optimum allocation of resources, game theory, and interest and capital. P/NP or letter grading.

102. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 101. Theory of income, employment, and price level. Analysis of secular growth and business fluctuations; introduction to monetary and fiscal policy. P/NP or letter grading.

103. Introduction to Econometrics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 11, and 41 or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Enforced corequisite: course 103L. Introduction to theory and practice of econometrics, with goal to make students effective consumers and producers of empirical research in economics. Emphasis on intuitive understanding rather than on rigorous arguments; concepts illustrated with applications in economics. P/NP or letter grading.

103L. Econometrics Laboratory. (1) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 11, and 41 or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Enforced corequisite: course 103. Econometric analysis of case-based studies. Hands-on data collection and problem solving. Use of econometric software. P/NP or letter grading.

104. Data Science for Economists. (4) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 11, 103. Enforced corequisite: course 104L. In-depth discussion of multivariate regression. Introduction to estimation of multivariate regression, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests in context of multivariate regression. Discussion of instrumental variables and binary choice models. Emphasis on hands-on experience on data analytics and real data applications. P/NP or letter grading.

104L. Data Science for Economists Laboratory. (1) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 11, 103. Enforced corequisite: course 104. Econometric analysis of case-based studies. Hands-on data collection and problem solving. Use of econometric software. P/NP or letter grading.

106F. Finance. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102. Enforced corequisite: course 106FB. Enrollment priority to Business Economics majors. Introduction to principles of asset valuation and role of financial markets in market economy. Basic topics include time value of money, discounted cash flow analysis, CAPM model, and applications to public policy. Letter grading.

106G. Introduction to Game Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one to two hours (when scheduled). Requisite: course 101. Enforced corequisite: course 106GL. Enrollment priority to Business Economics majors. Introduction to basic ideas of game theory and strategic thinking. Discussion of ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, and signaling, with application to examples from economics, politics, business, and other real-life situations. Letter grading.

111. Theories of Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 11, 101, 103. Application of theoretical and empirical tools from microeconomics to provide insights into problems confronting low-income countries today and to evaluate policies that are likely to be effective in improving well-being of poorest on globe. P/NP or letter grading.

122. International Finance. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 102. Enforced corequisite: course 122L. Not open to students with credit for former course 120. Emphasis on interpretation of balance of payments and adjustment to national and international equilibria through changes in price levels, exchange rates, and national income. Other topics include making international payments, determination of exchange rates under various monetary standards, capital movements, exchange controls, and international monetary organization. P/NP or letter grading.

134. Environmental Economics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 41 or Statistics 12 or 13, and course 101 (may be waived with consent of instructor). Introduction to major ideas in natural resources and environmental economics, with emphasis on designing incentives to protect environment. Highlights important role of using empirical data to test hypotheses about pollution’s causes and consequences. P/NP or letter grading.

160. Money and Banking. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102. Principles of money and banking in U.S.; legal and institutional framework; money supply process; instruments, effects, and practice of monetary policy. P/NP or letter grading.

165. History of Capitalism in American Economy. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. Enforced corequisite: course 165L. How capitalism–what economists call market economy with well-defined and protected civil rights and property rights–has contributed to America’s economic growth. Quantitative course, with analysis of how different features of capitalist economies impact economic growth, investment, consumption, and technical change, using computer simulations based on prominent historical examples. P/NP or letter grading.

Frequently Asked Questions, of Current UCLA students:

Q: Can I elect to take courses P/NP?

A: As long as classes are remote during the pandemic, students can take electives P/NP. However, any required course must still be taken as a graded course.

Q: Where can I find the course descriptions for the Econ courses?

A: The UCLA Course Descriptions can be found at registrar.ucla.edu/Academics/CourseDescriptions

Q: Why should I take Summer courses at UCLA?

A: Taking courses during the Summer can be an excellent way to complete your degree in a timely manner, or even early. We are offering all required core courses this Summer as well as some elective courses. If you are a continuing UCLA out-of-state student, Non-Resident Tuition is not charged in the Summer.

Q: The course I want to take has a prerequisite that I will complete in the Spring Quarter. Can I still enroll in the course?

A: You must enroll in the prerequisite course first, then you can enroll in your desired Summer course.

Q: I am taking an Economics course in Summer Session A that is a prerequisite for an Economics course in Summer Session C. Can I take both courses?

A: Yes, but you will need to contact the Department of Economics Undergraduate Counselors for assistance. Because Summer is considered as one term in the enrollment system, an Undergraduate Academic Counselor in the Economics Department will need to enroll you into the Summer Session C course. We can do this after you have enrolled in the Summer Session A course.

Q: Do the same enrollment restrictions apply to Economics 106 courses?

A: During the Summer, all students who have completed the necessary prerequisites for an Econ 106 course may enroll.  In the Summer, the Econ 106 courses are not restricted to only Business Economics majors. Thus, summer is a great time for other majors interested in Econ 106 courses to take them!

Q: The Econ 106 courses offered in the summer do not have labs. Will they still count towards my Economics or Business Economics major?

A: Yes! The Econ 106 courses in Summer will still count towards your major requirements as either a required Econ 106 course (for Business Economics majors) or a major elective. You will not be required to take the lab for the course in a future term. If you are a Business Economics major, please note that you still need two lab courses for your major requirements. This means either taking additional Econ 106 courses during the academic year, or completing upper division Economics electives that have labs offered. If you have further questions about this, please contact the Department of Economics Undergraduate Counselors.

Q: How many units can I take during the summer, as a UCLA student?

A: UCLA students may take a maximum of 18 units during the summer.

Q: Can I live on campus?

A: Yes. On campus housing is available all summer. Information can be found at housing.ucla.edu

Q: What does it cost to attend Summer Session?

A: This varies, depending on your student status and the number of units you take.  For more information, visit www.summer.ucla.edu/fees

Q: How do I contact the UCLA Summer Sessions Office?

A: The Summer Sessions Office is located in 1331 Murphy Hall. You can also email the office at info@summer.ucla.edu or call 310.825.4101.

For additional FAQs, visit https://www.summer.ucla.edu/faq

Q: How do I contact the UCLA Economics Undergraduate Counseling Office?

A: The Counseling Office is located in 2263 Bunche Hall. You can also call 310.825.5118.  To contact the counselors online, visit economics.ucla.edu/undergraduate/contact-us/