Lower Division Courses

1. Principles of Economics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open to students with credit for former course 100. Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on allocation of resources and distribution of income through price system. P/NP or letter grading.

2. Principles of Economics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 1. Not open to students with credit for former course 100. Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on aggregative economics, including national income, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade. P/NP or letter grading.

11. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 1, 2, Mathematics 31A, 31B. Laws of demand, supply, returns, and costs; price and output determination in different market situations. P/NP or letter grading.

41. Statistics for Economists. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B. Not open to students with credit for former Statistics 11. Introduction to probability and statistics for economists, with emphasis on rigorous arguments. Letter grading.

97. Economic Toolkit. (2) Lecture, two hours. Should be taken prior to taking course 11. Coverage of essential mathematical and spreadsheet tools that Economics majors use in their core courses and upper division elective courses. Review of algebra (graphing lines, solving systems of equations), geometry (determining areas), calculus (first derivatives, partial differentiation, elementary integral calculus), and Excel (handling data, using simple arithmetical, mathematical, and financial functions, use of Solver), Offered in summer only. P/NP grading.

101. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 11. Theory of factor pricing and income distribution, general equilibrium, implications of pricing process for optimum allocation of resources, game theory, and interest and capital. P/NP or letter grading.

102. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 101. Theory of income, employment, and price level. Analysis of secular growth and business fluctuations; introduction to monetary and fiscal policy. P/NP or letter grading.

103. Introduction to Econometrics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 11, and 41 or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Enforced corequisite: course 103L. Introduction to theory and practice of econometrics, with goal to make students effective consumers and producers of empirical research in economics. Emphasis on intuitive understanding rather than on rigorous arguments; concepts illustrated with applications in economics. P/NP or letter grading.

103L. Econometrics Laboratory. (1) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 11, and 41 or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Enforced corequisite: course 103. Econometric analysis of case-based studies. Hands-on data collection and problem solving. Use of econometric software. P/NP or letter grading.

106F. Finance. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102. Enforced corequisite: course 106FB. Enrollment priority to Business Economics majors. Introduction to principles of asset valuation and role of financial markets in market economy. Basic topics include time value of money, discounted cash flow analysis, CAPM model, and applications to public policy. Letter grading.

106G. Introduction to Game Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one to two hours (when scheduled). Requisite: course 101. Enforced corequisite: course 106GL. Enrollment priority to Business Economics majors. Introduction to basic ideas of game theory and strategic thinking. Discussion of ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, and signaling, with application to examples from economics, politics, business, and other real-life situations. Letter grading.

122. International Finance. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 102. Enforced corequisite: course 122L. Not open to students with credit for former course 120. Emphasis on interpretation of balance of payments and adjustment to national and international equilibria through changes in price levels, exchange rates, and national income. Other topics include making international payments, determination of exchange rates under various monetary standards, capital movements, exchange controls, and international monetary organization. P/NP or letter grading.

M134. Environmental Economics. (4) (Same as Environment M134.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 41 or Statistics 12 or 13, and course 101 (may be waived with consent of instructor). Introduction to major ideas in natural resources and environmental economics, with emphasis on designing incentives to protect environment. Highlights important role of using empirical data to test hypotheses about pollution’s causes and consequences. P/NP or letter grading.

160. Money and Banking. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102. Principles of money and banking in U.S.; legal and institutional framework; money supply process; instruments, effects, and practice of monetary policy. P/NP or letter grading.

Frequently Asked Questions, of Current UCLA students:

Q: Where can I find the course descriptions for the Econ courses?

A: The UCLA Course Descriptions can be found at registrar.ucla.edu/Academics/CourseDescriptions

Q: Why should I take Summer courses at UCLA?

A: Taking courses during the Summer can be an excellent way to complete your degree in a timely manner, or even early. We are offering all required core courses this Summer as well as some elective courses. If you are a continuing UCLA out-of-state student, Non-Resident Tuition is not charged in the Summer.

Q: The course I want to take has a prerequisite that I will complete in Spring Quarter 2017. Can I still enroll in the course?

A: You must enroll in the prerequisite course first, then you can enroll in your desired Summer course.

Q: I am taking an Economics course in Summer Session A that is a prerequisite for an Economics course in Summer Session C. Can I take both courses?

A: Yes, but you will need to contact the Department of Economics Undergraduate Counseling Office in room 2263 Bunche Hall for assistance. Because Summer is considered as one term in the enrollment system, an Undergraduate Academic Counselor in the Economics Department will need to enroll you into the Summer Session C course. We can do this after you have enrolled in the Summer Session A course.

Q: Do the same enrollment restrictions apply to Economics 106 courses?

A: During the Summer, all students who have completed the necessary prerequisites for an Econ 106 course may enroll. They are not restricted to only Business Economics majors. Thus, summer is a great time for other majors interested in Econ 106 courses to take them!

Q: The Econ 106 courses do not have labs. Will they still count towards my Economics or Business Economics major?

A: Yes! The Econ 106 courses in Summer will still count towards your major requirements as either a required Econ 106 course (for Business Economics majors) or a major elective. You will not be required to take the lab for the course in a future term. If you are a Business Economics major, please note that you still need two lab courses for your major requirements. This means either taking additional Econ 106 courses during the academic year, or completing upper division Economics electives that have labs offered. If you have further questions about this, please contact the Department of Economics Undergraduate Counseling Office in room 2263 Bunche Hall.

Q: How many units can I take during the summer, as a UCLA student?

A: UCLA students may take a maximum of 18 units during the summer.

Q: Can I live on campus?

A: Yes. On campus housing is available all summer. Information can be found at housing.ucla.edu

Q: What does it cost to attend Summer Session?

A: This varies, depending on your student status and the number of units you take.  For more information, visit www.summer.ucla.edu/fees

Q: How do I contact the UCLA Summer Sessions Office?

A: The Summer Sessions Office is located in 1331 Murphy Hall. You can also email the office at info@summer.ucla.edu or call 310.825.4101.

For additional FAQs, visit www.summer.ucla.edu/faq/registration

Q: How do I contact the UCLA Economics Undergraduate Counseling Office?

A: The Counseling Office is located in 2263 Bunche Hall. You can also call 310.825.5118.

To contact us online, visit economics.ucla.edu/undergraduate/contact-us/